Animus Terrae Community

is creating a rewilding project in Northern Arizona
Select a membership level
Supporter
$3
per patron-only blog post (one per month)
  • Access to monthly newsletter to include several photos of wildlife and plants. In the newsletter we will describe how the land and our lifestyle is changing and what we’re learning.
Collaborator
$15
per patron-only blog post (one per month)
  • Access to monthly newsletter to include several photos of wildlife and plants. In the newsletter we will describe how the land and our lifestyle is changing and what we’re learning.
  • Spend a weekend with us at Antelope Run. We will provide room and board.

3

patrons

$63

per patron-only blog post (one per month)

About Animus Terrae Community

The Antelope Run Rewilding Project is forty acres of ranch land some fifty miles west of Flagstaff. The land, sparsely populated by junipers, grasses, and a few cacti, is beautiful but sadly overgrazed. We’ve heard story after story from our new neighbors about gardens and livestock decimated by the local wildlife because the animals have little else to eat in the area. We would like to get a little homestead going with a garden and a flock of chickens, but we realize this is going to be challenging in such an unbalanced ecosystem.

Instead of building maximum security facilities for our garden and livestock as many of our neighbors have done, we are going to try something a little different. We want to provide for the antelope and other wildlife we see every day as well as for ourselves. Our experiment will be to find ways to work with nature in a mutually beneficial relationship instead of trying to wrestle a living from it.

The costs of our experiment are detailed below:

The first thing we need to do is to give the land a rest from the cattle. They are cute and pleasant, but out here on the open range they are munching the grasses down to stubble. The plan is to put a wildlife-permeable fence around the forty acres to keep the cattle out but allow other creatures to pass through. If we do the labor ourselves and source recycled posts, we figure the fence will cost about $1500.

Next, we are going to cover as much of the ground as we can with local grass and wildflower seeds. Seeds are going to be expensive.  With your help we will do a little at a time.  When the grass starts to grow back we will bring in bees and butterflies.

The next steps in this experiment are to be determined.

We are very grateful for the opportunity to steward this land. We welcome your support and we are excited to share this adventure with you.

Aside from Patreon, our other fundraising effort is to host campers for $15 per night. Learn more about camping at Antelope Run here.

About us:

Originally from Bellingham Washington, Laura Banks has been living in central Arizona for about three years, including two years as a member of the experimental community at Arcosanti. She has earned a BA in Sustainable Community Development and an MA in Anthropology and Social Ecology, both at Prescott College. She is currently working as a seasonal field hand on a small farm. She enjoys creative writing, sewing and bicycling.

Originally from Ipswich England, Michael Pond has been living in central Arizona for about ten years. He moved into an ashram in his early twenties and taught yoga for fifteen years. In the 1970s he attended one of the first solar energy classes in Albuquerque and studied homeopathy. He studied wildlife tracking with Tom Brown and Lakota Seven Ceremonies with Gilbert Walking Bull. He has also lived on a sailboat for a few years and worked as a paramedic. He moved to Sedona Arizona in 2006 to study spiritual psychology with Dr. David R. Hawkins MD PhD.
Goals
$63 of $300 per patron-only blog post (one per month)
We are spending pledges on fencing materials to keep the free range cattle from trampling the grass and other plants as the land heals, and we are buying birdseed for the wild birds which are an important part of regenerating the damaged ecosystem.  We hope to have the fence completed and begin sewing native grass in the fall of 2018.
1 of 1

Recent posts by Animus Terrae Community