Arakara

is creating Music
Select a membership level
Youngling
$1
per month
-Get access to supporter-only goodies like early updates, demos, giveaways, behind-the-scenes content, and more!

-Get access to the Patreon community with other fans and supporters.
-Get a warm fuzzy feeling inside.

Warrior
$5
per month
-Get access to our Google Calendar which includes our show schedule as well as unnanounced things like tours in planning, music video dates, interviews, show offers, recordings, and more.
-Get access to "The Tribe," a Facebook group (with us in it) where you can talk directly to us, get exclusive updates and material, and chat about whatever.
-Includes all rewards for lower tiers as well.
Chieftan
$15
per month
-Get guaranteed admission into any concert we play (at the promoter's discretion).

-25% off merch

-Name listed in the credits of albums as a supporter and Tribe Member.
-Includes all rewards for lower tiers as well.

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patrons

$0

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About Arakara

The Problem

Deciding to be a full-time musician is possibly the strangest job on the planet. While there are always risks and a fair amount of “spend money to make money” involved in any new startup, musicians face a particular set of challenges. Some of these challenges are fairly common – marketing, for example, is a challenge faced by any business – but the entertainment industry seems to face two unique challenges. The first is that many people seem to feel that they shouldn't have to pay for their entertainment. Free streaming services like Spotify and YouTube are at an all-time high, and fans have found ways to block the adds to make their own experience more enjoyable while cheating the artists out of what little money the streaming services give them from advertising. The second problem is middlemen - that is, labels and press and industry-types who determine what's in and what isn't, who gets to be funded and who doesn't, and ultimately who “makes it” and who doesn't while simultaneously raising the overhead costs of success by taking their “cut.”

The Evidence

Music industry experts compare selling music to selling bottled water. People can get it for free just by turning on the sink, so why do people still pay for bottled water, an industry who hasn't suffered in the slightest with the rise of home filtration systems and such. Consider Netflix. Netflix would be a perfect example of how the entertainment industry changed with the times and redefined success. For a tiny, reasonable price entertainment is delivered straight to the subscriber with such ease that all they have to do is turn on their TV and start watching their favorite show. Netflix also provides exclusive benefits for their subscribers – many fan-favorite and critically acclaimed shows are “Netflix Originals” - and sometimes brings material to fans earlier than expected.

The message is clear: fans are willing to support the things they love, but they want to know that they're getting their money's worth. Employees at entry-level jobs often feel frustrated that they do the vast majority of the work while receiving the smallest paycheck. Wouldn't you want the hardest-working and most-deserving people to receive the majority of your money as a consumer? Music is no different. While labels can sometimes be incredibly helpful and beneficial to a band, they are notorious for keeping band profits for years – plunging the bands into mountains of up-front debt to pay for recording, marketing, touring, and generally getting the band out there, and the band doesn't see a dime for years until the debt is paid off, by which point the label might be pressuring the band for another album to stay relevant, so the band is now stuck in an endless cycle of debt/break-even without ever seeing a paycheck for their work. We're not talking about hobbyists, mind you. We're talking about people who do this full-time. Shouldn't anyone who works a full-time job be able to at least make ends meet? But yet, musicians rarely are. And most often, the gatekeepers make a living off the hard work of the touring bands.

Which brings us to the second point: middlemen. In the 1980s the only way to “make it” was to move to Los Angeles, hope you played a show in front of a record label A&R scout, and sold your soul from there. For better or worse though, this isn't 1980 anymore. The rise of the internet allows for anyone to broadcast their content to the world, and the good news is that this allows us to cut out the middleman. Rather than making half of an album sale, bands can now pocket the entire thing. Bands can now keep merch costs lower because their ability to find and work with local, more cost-efficient sources. The point here isn't that “bands can make more profit,” the point here is “it doesn't take as much for bands to break even and keep going as it used to.” Being a full-time musician is more feasible than ever before.

The Solution

No one who plays metal does it for the money. If we were in this for the money, we'd all be session musicians or cover bands or music teachers (teachers aren't exactly billionaires but generally speaking they can usually pay their rent with their jobs). We're doing this because we love it. We're doing this because we know the way heavy music has impacted us and we see the way it resonates with our fans. We love to tour and meet new people who were impacted positively by our music. We love to share the stage with other talented bands, and we love to share in the music experience with fans and artists alike. This truly is an industry like no other, and we consider ourselves very lucky to be able to do what we do. This Patreon isn't about being a rockstar or getting famous. It's simply about being able to get paid fairly for our work and being able to continue making music as long as our fans want us to.
Goals
$0 of $7,107 per month
Minimum living wage in the United States is considered to be $10.25 per hour, or $410.00 per week on a 40 hour work week. Our goal is to reach a monthly contribution on our Patreon of $7,106.67. It will no doubt take us a while to get there, but that's what we're aiming for.

Divided by 4 people this works out to $21,320.00 each per year. We have no expectations of wealth or riches. Rather, we have a dream of being able to do Arakara full time and be able to survive financially in the process.
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Recent posts by Arakara

By becoming a patron, you'll instantly unlock access to 4 exclusive posts
1
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2
Links
1
Video
By becoming a patron, you'll instantly unlock access to 4 exclusive posts
1
Image
2
Links
1
Video