Jeannette de Beauvoir

Jeannette de Beauvoir

is creating fiction that uncovers truths... and a few dark secrets

9

patrons
Hi, my name’s Jeannette, and I’m a writer.

If that sounds like a confession, it pretty much is. I wrote my first novel when I was eight years old. (It was truly terrible.) I wrote another novel when I was ten, and it was marginally better. Ever the optimist, I’ve been working to improve on those performances in the decades since. I’m now a bestselling and award-winning author of mystery and historical fiction, and I love what I do. Not only that, but I know I do it well. (Which is a good thing, since it’s pretty much the only thing I do well!)

Why do I need patrons? I need them—you—because I need time.

We all have the same number of hours in the day, so you can’t give me any more of those. What I need from you is the time I spend currently on my day jobs; I support my writing career with freelance copywriting and editing gigs that absorb the best of my time, energy, and creativity. That leaves the author in me with not much left.

What a lot of people don’t realize is that the “author” career takes more than just sitting down at a desk and writing, though heaven knows that’s challenging enough, especially when you consider the thinking and plotting and fixing mistakes and all the rest that goes into it. Whew!

But writing is a business. On the front end, there’s research, travel, meetings. Then there’s writing the book itself, no small thing, which often engenders still more research and meetings. There’s trying to get it reviewed before it’s published; there’s working with the cover designer; there are revisions. And then there’s the whole sales cycle: going on blog tours, traveling to speaking engagements, creating and doing promotional activities, interviews, signings… What we’re talking about, in general, is the equivalent of a 60-hour week.

Which I would be delighted to do… except for those pesky freelance gigs, which are what pay the mortgage, buy the groceries, keep my ancient car on the road and my cat in kibbles. The “day jobs” already take up about 40 hours. And I wonder why people say they never see me anymore!

It’s not just the time, though: it’s the choices we make with our time. I’ve chosen to write (or it’s chosen me!), and that means I don’t take care of myself as well as I should. I don’t exercise enough. I don’t take vacations. I’m not whining here; this is my choice. But I also know that I produce better work when I’m rested and physically healthy. My books are my life and my legacy, and my understanding is they’re providing you with some entertainment as well, so I want them to be the very best they can be.

I've concluded that it's time I spent my time and energy on one career. My name is Jeannette, and I’m a writer.



Determining which books will sell well—and which won’t—is the crapshoot of the century. Okay: I signed on for the uncertainty of success. But with that uncertainty comes an extraordinarily irregular income.  And to top it off, there are those who can’t live with that kind of uncertainty: my mortgage company, my condominium association, the electric company, and sundry others who expect a check on a certain date. That’s the world I live in, and that’s why I have the freelance gigs and I write novels to contracts so there is at least something in the pot when the first of the month rolls around. Regularly. Predictably.

But I pay a price for that. I’ve had to refuse some amazing opportunities because I needed to keep the regular income flow and couldn’t take time off to do something that might, ironically enough, advance my career—or even just be great for my soul.
  • I turned down the offer of a TED Talk (who turns down a TED Talk?). 
  • I removed my name from a list of finalists for an incredible writing residency in Paris (who turns down a Paris residency?). 
  • I’ve stopped writing short stories and poetry because they’re beautiful and absorbing and don’t bring in any income. 
I’ve done all this because there just isn’t time to do them along with my freelance make-a-living work. 

It’s not just the time, though: it’s also the space. I don’t mean physical space, though that’s important, too: one does really need a clean, well-lighted room of one’s own, to mix two literary quotations. I’ve worked hard to get that (thank you, freelance gigs!). But a lot of the important work a writer does is invisible. It gets done in her head. It gets done by reading—a lot of reading—and thinking, and reflecting. Fiction doesn’t just fall from heaven in a Glad bag: it has to be created. Thought about. Worried over. Sometimes I lie on my sofa staring at the ceiling as I figure out something about a character or a plot twist or a setting. I’m not napping (gotcha!); I’m working. But who pays for that kind of work?

It needs to happen somehow. I need to write more, and better; put more books into my readers’ hands and accept the opportunities to go and talk with people who want to hear about them.



As I said at the beginning, what I want is time. You can give me that time—you, and other people like you, just by pledging a small amount every month to keep me reading and thinking and writing.

Here’s what I want to do:
  • Write three books a year in the Sydney Riley Provincetown mystery series. I missed the second one for 2018 because—you guessed it—I ran out of time. I don’t like missing deadlines and I don’t ever want to do that again.
  • Begin my next mystery series, which will involve some travel.
  • Write a few standalones that have been gathering dust in the back of my brain.
  • Write some short stories (even make them into a collection) and get back to having the occasional poem published in a literary journal.
  • Share my work through speaking and teaching opportunities.

I want to quit one of my freelance gigs, because even an extra 20 hours/week will make a tremendous difference in my writing productivity and quality. That's why I'm asking for your help.




Everything here will be exclusive to patrons, so if you already subscribe to my newsletter, know that this is new stuff! I’ve always been enamored of writing tools and utensils (I consider the Levenger catalog “office porn”), so I’m using them to mark my patronage levels:

Buy me some pencils: This is only two dollars a month, what have you got to lose? You’ll receive:
  • drafts of a work in progress as I write them. (They need to be drafts, because otherwise the stories are considered "published" and I lose First Publication rights.)
  • one weekly podcast (usually me reading from one of my novels, so you can take my work with you!
  • your name in the acknowledgments of all future books

Buy me some pens: For only five dollars a month, you’ll get the same as the "pencils" level, plus
  • access to a weekly video talk

Buy me a fountain pen for $12/month, and you’ll get levels one and two plus:
  • a monthly podcast interview with an author (me or someone else)
  • a monthly essay or article

Finally, “written in blood” (as all good novels are… the creator’s blood, of course!), for $20 and more a month, you’ll receive what everyone else is getting, plus:
  • your name in a separate part of the acknowledgments 
  • a draft version of a new short story, poem, or other work in progress
  • pictures of my inspiration, Beckett the cat
  • some random and delightful treats
  • signed copies of my books



So that’s it! Thank you for doing good in the world. You’re not just supporting my writing; you’re supporting Writing with a capital “w,” the creation of something that will outlive us all and maybe even help change the world. I’ve always believed the adage that “if you write the stories for a society, it doesn’t matter who writes the laws.” I’m writing those stories, and you’re writing them along with me. Thank you!

Tiers
Pencils
$2 or more per month
To keep me in pencils, you'll receive...
Pens
$5 or more per month
To keep me in pens, you'll receive...
Fountain pens
$12 or more per month
To keep me in fountain pens, you'll receive...
Written in blood
$20 or more per month
To keep me writing passionately, you'll receive...
Goals
18% complete
I want to quit one of my freelance gigs, because an extra 20 hours/week will make a tremendous difference in my writing productivity and quality. You can help by pledging whatever you can afford... and I'll give you lots of cool stuff in return!


1 of 1
Hi, my name’s Jeannette, and I’m a writer.

If that sounds like a confession, it pretty much is. I wrote my first novel when I was eight years old. (It was truly terrible.) I wrote another novel when I was ten, and it was marginally better. Ever the optimist, I’ve been working to improve on those performances in the decades since. I’m now a bestselling and award-winning author of mystery and historical fiction, and I love what I do. Not only that, but I know I do it well. (Which is a good thing, since it’s pretty much the only thing I do well!)

Why do I need patrons? I need them—you—because I need time.

We all have the same number of hours in the day, so you can’t give me any more of those. What I need from you is the time I spend currently on my day jobs; I support my writing career with freelance copywriting and editing gigs that absorb the best of my time, energy, and creativity. That leaves the author in me with not much left.

What a lot of people don’t realize is that the “author” career takes more than just sitting down at a desk and writing, though heaven knows that’s challenging enough, especially when you consider the thinking and plotting and fixing mistakes and all the rest that goes into it. Whew!

But writing is a business. On the front end, there’s research, travel, meetings. Then there’s writing the book itself, no small thing, which often engenders still more research and meetings. There’s trying to get it reviewed before it’s published; there’s working with the cover designer; there are revisions. And then there’s the whole sales cycle: going on blog tours, traveling to speaking engagements, creating and doing promotional activities, interviews, signings… What we’re talking about, in general, is the equivalent of a 60-hour week.

Which I would be delighted to do… except for those pesky freelance gigs, which are what pay the mortgage, buy the groceries, keep my ancient car on the road and my cat in kibbles. The “day jobs” already take up about 40 hours. And I wonder why people say they never see me anymore!

It’s not just the time, though: it’s the choices we make with our time. I’ve chosen to write (or it’s chosen me!), and that means I don’t take care of myself as well as I should. I don’t exercise enough. I don’t take vacations. I’m not whining here; this is my choice. But I also know that I produce better work when I’m rested and physically healthy. My books are my life and my legacy, and my understanding is they’re providing you with some entertainment as well, so I want them to be the very best they can be.

I've concluded that it's time I spent my time and energy on one career. My name is Jeannette, and I’m a writer.



Determining which books will sell well—and which won’t—is the crapshoot of the century. Okay: I signed on for the uncertainty of success. But with that uncertainty comes an extraordinarily irregular income.  And to top it off, there are those who can’t live with that kind of uncertainty: my mortgage company, my condominium association, the electric company, and sundry others who expect a check on a certain date. That’s the world I live in, and that’s why I have the freelance gigs and I write novels to contracts so there is at least something in the pot when the first of the month rolls around. Regularly. Predictably.

But I pay a price for that. I’ve had to refuse some amazing opportunities because I needed to keep the regular income flow and couldn’t take time off to do something that might, ironically enough, advance my career—or even just be great for my soul.
  • I turned down the offer of a TED Talk (who turns down a TED Talk?). 
  • I removed my name from a list of finalists for an incredible writing residency in Paris (who turns down a Paris residency?). 
  • I’ve stopped writing short stories and poetry because they’re beautiful and absorbing and don’t bring in any income. 
I’ve done all this because there just isn’t time to do them along with my freelance make-a-living work. 

It’s not just the time, though: it’s also the space. I don’t mean physical space, though that’s important, too: one does really need a clean, well-lighted room of one’s own, to mix two literary quotations. I’ve worked hard to get that (thank you, freelance gigs!). But a lot of the important work a writer does is invisible. It gets done in her head. It gets done by reading—a lot of reading—and thinking, and reflecting. Fiction doesn’t just fall from heaven in a Glad bag: it has to be created. Thought about. Worried over. Sometimes I lie on my sofa staring at the ceiling as I figure out something about a character or a plot twist or a setting. I’m not napping (gotcha!); I’m working. But who pays for that kind of work?

It needs to happen somehow. I need to write more, and better; put more books into my readers’ hands and accept the opportunities to go and talk with people who want to hear about them.



As I said at the beginning, what I want is time. You can give me that time—you, and other people like you, just by pledging a small amount every month to keep me reading and thinking and writing.

Here’s what I want to do:
  • Write three books a year in the Sydney Riley Provincetown mystery series. I missed the second one for 2018 because—you guessed it—I ran out of time. I don’t like missing deadlines and I don’t ever want to do that again.
  • Begin my next mystery series, which will involve some travel.
  • Write a few standalones that have been gathering dust in the back of my brain.
  • Write some short stories (even make them into a collection) and get back to having the occasional poem published in a literary journal.
  • Share my work through speaking and teaching opportunities.

I want to quit one of my freelance gigs, because even an extra 20 hours/week will make a tremendous difference in my writing productivity and quality. That's why I'm asking for your help.




Everything here will be exclusive to patrons, so if you already subscribe to my newsletter, know that this is new stuff! I’ve always been enamored of writing tools and utensils (I consider the Levenger catalog “office porn”), so I’m using them to mark my patronage levels:

Buy me some pencils: This is only two dollars a month, what have you got to lose? You’ll receive:
  • drafts of a work in progress as I write them. (They need to be drafts, because otherwise the stories are considered "published" and I lose First Publication rights.)
  • one weekly podcast (usually me reading from one of my novels, so you can take my work with you!
  • your name in the acknowledgments of all future books

Buy me some pens: For only five dollars a month, you’ll get the same as the "pencils" level, plus
  • access to a weekly video talk

Buy me a fountain pen for $12/month, and you’ll get levels one and two plus:
  • a monthly podcast interview with an author (me or someone else)
  • a monthly essay or article

Finally, “written in blood” (as all good novels are… the creator’s blood, of course!), for $20 and more a month, you’ll receive what everyone else is getting, plus:
  • your name in a separate part of the acknowledgments 
  • a draft version of a new short story, poem, or other work in progress
  • pictures of my inspiration, Beckett the cat
  • some random and delightful treats
  • signed copies of my books



So that’s it! Thank you for doing good in the world. You’re not just supporting my writing; you’re supporting Writing with a capital “w,” the creation of something that will outlive us all and maybe even help change the world. I’ve always believed the adage that “if you write the stories for a society, it doesn’t matter who writes the laws.” I’m writing those stories, and you’re writing them along with me. Thank you!

Recent posts by Jeannette de Beauvoir

Tiers
Pencils
$2 or more per month
To keep me in pencils, you'll receive...
Pens
$5 or more per month
To keep me in pens, you'll receive...
Fountain pens
$12 or more per month
To keep me in fountain pens, you'll receive...
Written in blood
$20 or more per month
To keep me writing passionately, you'll receive...